Welcome to St. John Lutheran Church

"'Sharing The Joy Of His News' by growing inward through God's Word, Sacraments and Fellowship; and by growing outward
through words, actions and mission outreach.
" - St. John Lutheran Church


The Divine Service

The Divine Service is the center of our life of faith in Christ. It is celebrated every Sunday at 9:00 a.m. The Sacrament of the Altar is celebrated on odd Sundays of the month and festival days. Holy Communion is also offered on Wednesday evenings during portions of the year. (Please select the link below or see the Church calendar for any alterations to our Seasonal and Midweek Worship Service times.)

Parish Services


Faces of the Reformation

Luther was raised by God-fearing parents who sacrificed to give their son an education. Planning to become a lawyer, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt. (His courses in grammar, logic and rhetoric provided the tools Luther later used to study and interpret Scripture.) Law was a profession that was not only respected but would also ensure his ability to care for his parents in their later years. One day Luther was caught in a violent thunderstorm. He prayed to St. Anne, promising to become a monk if his life was spared. This was not a promise he took lightly. Much to the disappointment of his father, Luther shed his worldly life to enter the Augustinian monastery.

It was here that Luther fasted and prayed, constantly seeking to live a perfect and holy life for God’s approval. This attempt to live a holy life included visiting and revering holy relics. There were relics that were reputed to be a splinter from the cross, or a branch from the burning bush, the hair of this saint or a piece of cloth from that one. Even Luther’s trip to Rome, a city filled with more relics than any other in Europe, could not put his soul at ease. He could never be good enough for this righteous God. Despair set in. Luther’s vicar (or priest), Johann von Staupitz, brought him to Wittenberg where he could mentor Luther more closely.

Luther began an in-depth study of the Bible while teaching at the University of Wittenberg. He continued this study after finishing his doctorate, believing that the Bible was more important than the teachings of the Church Fathers. In 1514, while studying Paul’s letter to the Romans in his tower room, he finally saw the pure Gospel. He realized that sinners are saved not through good works but by the gift of God through faith. This insight into the Gospel and the assurance of his salvation gave him the confidence to overcome the challenges he would soon face.

The challenges began in the form of a man named Johann Tetzel. Tetzel was sent to Wittenberg to sell indulgences. After penitents confessed their sins, a priest might assign works of satisfaction as part of absolving sins. At first, indulgences were granted to Crusaders willing to sacrifice all in defense of the Church. Those who could not go could support the effort financially and also receive an indulgence, or pardon from sin.

This was so lucrative that the practice was soon used to raise funds for churches and hospitals, even infrastructure. Frederick the Wise would display his relics on All Saints Day, Nov. 1. The faithful could pay homage to the relics, pay money to Frederick and everyone would be happy at the end of the day; sins forgiven, revenues up. The three parts to penance changed from contrition, confession and absolution to contrition, confession and contribution.

Luther’s concern was that there would no longer be any sense of true contrition. If sinners could receive pardon from all sins, then they could spend the rest of their lives not worrying about the statuses of their souls. He must protect his flock from this dangerous practice.

On Oct. 31, 1517, Luther posted his 95 Theses on the Castle Church doors, seeking a scholarly debate on the sale of indulgences. Although he wrote them in Latin, they were surreptitiously translated into German and distributed throughout the land, sparking the events that began the Reformation.


From the Elders

It's still all about Jesus

Open your average world history book and you’ll find but a paragraph or two on the Reformation. The event appears a small drop on the timeline, but the Christian Church knows better.

Since the past is best explored through the people who lived it, the Elders at St. John would like to introduce you to a series of men and women passionate about the Reformation re-discovery of the Gospel— either for or against it. These iconic individuals used their unique vocations to create theological and cultural tidal waves beginning in the sixteenth century and continuing today. See how the gracious Word of the Lord had the final word in bringing the “it’s still all about Jesus” proclamation to the corners of Europe and beyond. (More...)

Updated: 10.01.16

Announcements

  • Flowers on the Altar

    A calendar has been placed in the entryway of the church to reserve a date to place flowers on the altar. If you would like to donate toward flowers, the Ladies’ Aid Altar Committee will purchase the flowers and place them on the altar for you. Only live flowers are placed on the altar. (Flowers will not be placed on the altar during the seasons of Advent and Lent). If you have questions please contact LaVonne Nitzel, JoAnn Renner or Diane Kahle.  

    Updated: 01.04.16
  • Lutheran Witness Online

    The Lutheran Witness Current IssueThe Lutheran Witness is the flagship magazine of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. The Lutheran Witness is a monthly publication (11 issues per year) that offers Synod news, features, columns, Q&A's, and more.

  • KFUO Radio Online

    Listen to KFUO

    For over 90 years, KFUO has been dedicated to broadcasting the Gospel of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, to listeners around the globe. You can help take this message to the ends of the earth by supporting this ministry.
  • Orphan Grain Train

    We can once again send used clothing to Orphan Grain Train. When leaving clothes at the back door, please mark them for either OGT (Orphan Grain Train) or PCM (People's City Mission).

  • Electronic Newsletter

    Please consider receiving your monthly newsletter via email or downloaded from our website to conserve and save paper. The bulletin and readings are also available via email the Tuesday after Sunday’s service. Please contact our church secretary, Cathy Hollman at the office to be added to the group email, 402.826.3883. Thank you for going GREEN!

    Updated: 01.04.16

Worship Services

Worship services at St. John are scheduled each Sunday and Wednesday. Sunday morning Communion services are held on the odd numbered weeks each month with non-communion services held on the even numbered Sundays. (Seasonally adjusted Service Times...)

  • Sunday Morning - 9:00 a.m.
  • Wednesday Evening - (Held during the Advent and Lenten Season - See Calendar during those months for service times.)

 

Sunday Bible Class

Join us on Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. for adult Bible class where a variety of topics, always Gospel centered. Currently, "Being Lutheran" by A. Trevor Sutton is being discussed.

Jesus Christ brings the Gospel (from older English, "Good-spel," "good news") to the world. He announces that in His person the kingdom of God has come to mankind and that through faith in Him people might find new and eternal life. He is Himself the Good News, or Gospel.